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Dalia Antonia Muller

Assistant Professor
Associate Director,
Caribbean Studies Program
office: 563 Park Hall
email: daliamul@buffalo.edu
phone: (716) 645-8414

CV

Education

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley (2007)
M.A., University of California, Berkeley (2002)
B.A., Yale University (1999)

Field(s)

Latin America, North and South Atlantic, Imperialism/Colonialism, Political History, Transnational

Courses Taught

219: Latin America and the United States
HIS 322 Latin America Culture and History
426, Modern Latin America
420, Beyond Paradise: The Making of the Modern Caribbean
506, North and South Atlantic Core
550: Cuba
560, Caribbean History and Culture

Research Interests

Latin America and Caribbean / Gulf region; expatriates and exiles; Pan-Americanism, Hispanism and Americanismo

Current Research

I am currently working on two book projects. The first, currently titled “Cultures of Circulation, Traditions of Subversion: The Making of the Gulf World in the Americas,” will give substance and weight to the framework of the Gulf World, which I develop in my first book. Here I make the case that If we focus not just on the trade and transportation networks that linked the space between what is now Mexico, Cuba and the United States, but on the movement, migrations and circulations of the diverse travelers who crisscrossed the Gulf of Mexico legally and illegally in the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries, it becomes evident that the the Gulf, while connected to a greater Caribbean and even greater Atlantic and Pacific spheres, became a world unto itself. This book offers readers and scholars a new conceptualization of the region rooted in the case studies of travelers who subverted authority as they laid claim to and shaped the Gulf World through their movements and migrations over three centuries.

The second book project is titled “The Boundaries and the Bonds of Cuban Citizenship During a Time of Transition.” This book is a study of citizenship in Cuba during the first U.S. occupation and the early republic. On one hand, I explore the struggles of migrants stranded abroad after the Cuban independence war who were denied rights and protections that they should have enjoyed as Cuban citizens. On the other hand, I examine the struggles of self- identified Africans in Cuba who resisted membership in the Cuban nation, but were forced to accept Cuban citizenship.

Books

Cuban Émigrés and Independence in the Nineteenth-Century Gulf World
(UNC press (Envisioning Cuba) May 1, 2017).

http://uncpress.unc.edu/books/13949.html 

Interview with Professor Muller about Cuban Émigrés and Independence in the Nineteenth Century Gulf World on the New Books Network.

Articles

“Latin America and the Question of Cuban Independence,” The Americas, 68:2, October 2011: 209-239.

Awards

  • History Faculty Research Fund, UB, Spring 2016, Fall 2017.
  • Dr. Nuala McGann Drescher Leave Program Fellowship, UB, Spring 2014
  • Humanities Institute Research Fellowship, UB, Fall 2012. 
  • SUNY Faculty Diversity Program Fellow, 2009
  • Henry Morse Stephens Memorial Fellowship, 2003 and 2004
  • Tinker Summer Research Grant, 2002
  • Eugene Cota-Robles Fellowship, 2000

Affiliations

  • Latin American Studies Association
  • American Historical Association
  • Caribbean Studies Association
  • Conference on Latin American History