University at Buffalo Department of History

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Picture of Mazon's BookPatricia M. Mazón, Associate Professor
office: 584 Park
email: mazon@acsu.buffalo.edu
phone: (716) 645-8429


Education: B.A., Rice University, 1988; M.A,. Stanford, 1991; Ph.D., Stanford, 1995


Courses Regularly Taught:
HIS 299: The Holocaust and History
HIS 346: Nineteenth-Century Europe:  The Birth of Modern Europe, 1789-1914
HIS 315: German Culture and Society, 1790 to the Present
HIS 388: Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Europe, 1789 to the Present
HIS 4XX: Autobiography and European Women in the 20th Century
HIS 475: The Great War, 1914-1918: Europe and the Crisis of Modernity
HIS 580: Modern European Graduate Core
HIS 546/571: Readings in Modern German History
HIS 596: Topics in Modern European Gender History

Field(s): Modern Europe


Hub(s): Knowledge, Culture & Society, Gender, Politics


Research Interests: Culture and politics of modern Germany; higher education; gender


Current Research: My next project is entitled "Gender, Public Life, and National Discourse in the Postwar Germanies, 1945-2005."   This work considers the relationship between gender and the public sphere as it evolved in both the East German and West German states.   In many ways,   German women   in 1945 were poised to play a more prominent role in public life than in the past.   The Nazis had tried to push women, newly enfranchised in 1918, out of the public sphere as a reaction to the social upheaval and experimentation that had characterized   the Weimar period.   After World War II, the two German states that emerged each sought to differentiate itself from the Nazi regime.   Interestingly each state also saw itself as subscribing to a (different) part of the larger Enlightenment project.   The expectation in both East and West after the war was that women would now play a role, albeit limited, in public life.   This was, however, only partially realized in each state.   This project seeks to explore the opportunities and barriers to women in public life over the postwar decades, in particular as exemplified in the lives of Marion Dönhoff,   Hilde Benjamin, Alice Schwarzer, and Angela Merkel.


Selected Publications:
(Books)
Gender and the Modern Research University: The Admission of Women to German Higher Education, 1865-1914. Stanford University Press, 2003.

Editor, with Reinhild Steingröver, Not So Plain As Black and White: Afro-German History and Culture, 1890-2000. University of Rochester Press, 2005.



(Articles)
"Fräulein Doktor: Literary Images of the First Female University Students in Fin-de-Siècle Germany." Women in German Yearbook 16 (2000), 129-150.

"Germania Triumphant: The Niederwald National Monument and the Liberal Moment in Imperial Germany." German History 18:2 (2000), 162-192.

"Die Auswahl der 'besseren Elementen.' Ausländische und jüdische Studentinnen und die Zulassung der Frauen zu den deutschen Universitäten 1890-1909." Jahrbuch für Universitätsgeschichte 5 (2002), 185-198.


Affiliations and Other notes:


Campus Grant Coordinator, German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).  For more information about DAAD fellowships for UB students, click here.



Co-director, Graduate Group for German and Austrian Studies.

Campus liaison, Council for European Studies, Columbia University.

Last updated: Monday, October 20, 2008

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